Tuesday, August 7, 2012
For a team of Boulder scientists, the precise landing of Mars rover Curiosity late Sunday night is absolutely rad.
A radiation-hunting instrument — dubbed the Radiation Assessment Detector, or RAD — was born and bred in Boulder and was scheduled Monday to be switched on for three-and-a-half hours at midnight, said Don Hassler, of Boulder’s Southwest Research Institute.

For a team of Boulder scientists, the precise landing of Mars rover Curiosity late Sunday night is absolutely rad.

A radiation-hunting instrument — dubbed the Radiation Assessment Detector, or RAD — was born and bred in Boulder and was scheduled Monday to be switched on for three-and-a-half hours at midnight, said Don Hassler, of Boulder’s Southwest Research Institute.